by makeme

RepRap RAMPS Build

In Uncategorized on 11, Feb, 2011 at 12:00

I’m building a RepRap Mendel because one bot just isn’t enough.

The brains of my new bot will be a RepRap Arduino Mego Pololu Shield (RAMPS) because it’s a design that manages to be small, powerful, and line-replaceable. The biggest plus I can think of over the Makerbot electronics is that RAMPS fits the same functions into a much smaller package. That’s not entirely fair, because the MBI Gen 4 electronics are designed to be more flexible in potential applications than RAMPS, but I’m not looking for flexible at the moment. The biggest plus over the RepRap Generation 6 electronics is that the most important pieces are easily replaceable.

So, lets get to it. I found the Arduino Mega (2560) on Amazon, got the DIY RAMPS kit (v1.2) from Ultimachine and found some Pololu stepper drivers in stock at Robot Shop.

[update: I can confirm that this build works for running steppers from the Repsnapper control panel, but I’m still waiting for endstops, so I haven’t tested that function yet.]

[update: I can confirm this build works for running steppers, using min and max endstops, and sensing/controlling the extruder temperature. I don’t have a heated build platform, or a build cooling fan, so I can’t test those features.]

  1. Get out two 4.7K resistors and seven 100K resistors. IMG_0130
  2. Solder them into place. resistors
  3. Get out the 10nF 100nF capacitor and LED. IMG_0133
  4. Solder them into place. The LED’s polarity is not marked on the board, but the RepRap wiki instructions say the short lead goes closer to the bottom of the board. cap & LED fixed
  5. Get out several double stacked headers. IMG_0135
  6. Cut them into seven 2X3 units. IMG_0136
  7. Place them in their respective locations. IMG_0137
  8. Use tape to hold them in place. Now solder them drama free. IMG_0138
  9. Get some single headers. IMG_0139
  10. Cut off a single 1X4 unit. IMG_0140
  11. Place it in the T1-T0 location. Use the tape trick to solder it in place. thermister connection
  12. Get out four 1X16 female headers. IMG_0143
  13. Place them in the appropriate locations. IMG_0144
  14. Use a couple long strips of headers to keep the female connectors aligned and in place while you solder them. IMG_0145
  15. Get out the power terminals. IMG_0146
  16. Also, the little push button switch. IMG_0148
  17. Solder them in place. Be generous with the solder. IMG_0149
  18. Get out the Arduino Mega and associated headers. IMG_0150
  19. Cut one 2X18, one 1X6 and 5 1×8 units (it doesn’t matter if some of them are made out of multiple pieces). IMG_0151
  20. Insert the headers into their respective locations on the Arduino Mega board. IMG_0152
  21. Put the RAMPS shield down on top so that it seats nicely. IMG_0153
  22. After you’ve soldered all the headers in place, they’ll be perfectly lined up with the Arduino Mega. IMG_0154
  23. Get out one 100uF capacitor and two 10uF capacitors. IMG_0155
  24. Solder them in place. The polarity is marked on the board. capacitors
  25. Get out the three N-channel mosfets. IMG_0157
  26. Solder them in place. The proper orientation is marked on the board (a thick white line). IMG_0158
  27. Get out the fuse and diode. IMG_0159
  28. You have to install the fuse, but the diode is optional. According to the RepRap wiki the diode connects the RAMPS power terminal to the Arduino mega board. Without the diode you can theoretically run 35v through the steppers (more torque). With the diode you are limited to the 12v the Arduino is happy with (theoretically 20v, but don’t push it). IMG_0160
  29. Make yourself four 1×4 header units. IMG_0161
  30. Insert them in the appropriate locations next to the female headers. stepper connections
  31. Grab four Pololu break out board kits and make two 1×8 header units. Hopefully you don’t end up with 3 out of 4 kits containing 1×15 strips of headers instead of 1×16 (like I got). But, if you do, you should be able to make up the difference with some scraps from the RAMPS kit. IMG_0164
  32. Insert the eight 1×8 header units into the 1×16 female headers on the RAMPS shield. IMG_0165
  33. Set the four Pololu breakout boards on top. Now you can solder everything together with the correct alignment. IMG_0166
  34. Remove the four stepper drivers and get out twelve jumpers. IMG_0168
  35. Install three jumpers underneath each stepper driver for 1/16th stepping (default). jumpers
About these ads
  1. Beautiful!
    This is a huge help, thanks!

  2. Great documentation, thank you!

    On Step 4, the board and the reprap wiki list that cap as 100nf, not 10nf – I was confused for a bit. Please consider updating the description for step 3 and picture for step 4.

  3. NOTE: This is a V1.2 (or greater?) board. V1.1 boards require that 4 of the pins (A1,A2,B1,B2) on each Pololu board be soldered with the long leads pointing up, so the stepper connector can plug directly on to the top of the Pololu board.

  4. Great Guide!
    One note so far, Step 3 the 10nf capacitor should be 100nf

  5. Thanks for the corrections. I went back and realized the capacitor picture on the wiki has the same mistake, so I must have been lazy and looked at it instead of looking at the board itself.

  6. Super, Thanks its a gread help. A+++++++++++

  7. I highly recommend a more inside to outside approach. It makes everyone’s life easier, whether noob or pro, to not need to reach around soldered-on components to solder in the next piece. For example, the 100 uF capacitor before the green terminals.

  8. That’s a good suggestion. I didn’t have any trouble reaching around things myself, since the solder joints are on the other side of the board. Just clip the leads and you’ve got unrestricted access. But it wouldn’t hurt at all to rearrange the build order by location rather than component.

  9. […] Mega et le shield, c’est une solution qui se révèle relativement onéreuse… Voir ICI un article sur le montage de la […]

  10. […] findet ihr eine bessere Anleitung hier. Hab sie leider erst gefunden nachdem ich schon alles zusammen hatte […]

  11. […] you want to more about the electronics behind the SUMPOD then visit this site to learn more. Whilst it is not a SUMPOD page the electronic package is the one Richard has chosen […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: